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Review: Spook

Spook by Mary Roach

Title:  Spook:  Science Tackles the Afterlife
Author:  Mary Roach
Published: 2005
ISBN-13: 9780739467298
Publisher:  Norton
Twitter: @Mary_Roach
What’s Auntie Reading Now? picture
Publisher’s Blurb: “What happens when we die? Does the light just go out and that’s that—the million-year nap? Or will some part of my personality, my me-ness persist? What will that feel like? What will I do all day? Is there a place to plug in my lap-top?” In an attempt to find out, Mary Roach brings her tireless curiosity to bear on an array of contemporary and historical soul-searchers: scientists, schemers, engineers, mediums, all trying to prove (or disprove) that life goes on after we die.

This could also be titled Mary Roach Travels the World in Search of an Answer Which Doesn’t Exist.  The book starts in India with Roach trailing a doctor collecting anecdotes about reincarnation in search of proof that reincarnation actually exists.  It ends in a hospital at University of Virginia with a tablet computer mounted to the ceiling facing away from the operating table beneath it.  The researchers hope to prove out of body experiences by having a subject astral project and tell what’s on the computer screen.

Inbetween she travels to England to take classes to learn to be a psychic, gets a cold reading from someone, and discusses spiritualism along the lines of The Witch of Lime Street.  Roach’s snobbish tone arrives at the same place we all do, there is no scientific proof for what happens after we die.

Believers gonna believe, skeptics gonna question; ain’t none of us got a lock an answer which makes universal sense.  And while I didn’t mind the process Roach used to satisfy (or not) her curiosity, I did mind that while asking her questions, she was not so openly mocking those who believed in something with no proof.  That’s why it’s called faith, Mary, it can’t be proven.

My own reading, and conversations, have led me to the same conclusion many have, there may be something bigger than all of us at work (something I choose to believe in), but there’s no definitive answer to what happens next.  In the end, it isn’t what one believes or doesn’t, it’s how one behaves in the present that matters.  Chances are we won’t know what happens next even as it’s happening.

So good for Mary Roach for getting to go interesting places to ask questions about an interesting topic.  If only she’d been willing to set aside her preconceptions for the duration.

New to the Stacks: Genevieve Cogman

The Masked City by Genevieve Cogman
The Lost Plot by Genevieve Cogman
The Burning Page by Genevieve Cogman

Some evil, evil book warbler insisted upon telling me about this series about an interdimensional library, librarian spies … and dragons! I was helpless in this warbler’s clutches. Good thing I had birthday money to spend.

  • The Masked City – read
  • The Burning Page – read
  • The Lost Plot – read

Review: The Hakawati

The Hakawati by Rabih Alameddine
The Hakawati
by Rabih Alameddine

Title: The Hakawati
Author: Rabih Alameddine
Published: 2008
ISBN-13: 9780385664776
Publisher: Anchor Canada
This is a book of stories, about family, Identity, love of family filled with stories from  generations of storytellers.  In fact, Hakawati means storyteller.

Where do I begin with this?  The story of generations of storytellers in one family.  The strands of the stories weaving together the themes of identity (Lebanese or American?  musician, storyteller or engineer?), physical place, and place within the family structure are told.

Osama al-Kharrat returns to Beirut from Los Angeles to bear witness to his father’s death.  The entire family gathers around the hospital bed to reminisce and tell stories reaching generations back.  As with most family reunions, new stories are created as the now adult children discuss events from their childhood and discover the meaning of said events.

I love the way Alameddine weaves the many generations of stories together to tell the story of a this Lebanese family.  Anyone who enjoys good stories will love The Hakawati.

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